Triple launch bonanza!

all-three-book-event4

I’m very fortunate to be able to launch PICKLES VS THE ZOMBIES with two fantastic kids authors – Bev Katz and Joanne Levy this September!

September 7, at A Different Drummer Books in Burlington 
September 8, at Indigo Yonge and Eglinton in Toronto

pickles vs. the zombies cover_dec 20

Signing in St. John’s!

Two opportunities to get your PORTIA ADAMS books signed in St. John’s Newfoundland!

Friday
June 7
7PM
Broken Books
245 Duckworth St., St. John’s
Saturday
June 8
1PM
Chapters St. John’s
70 Kenmount Rd, St. John’s

Share with your friends and come by and say ‘Hi!’

EVENT: East Bound Conference June 7

I’m speaking at the East Bound Conference on June 7th, and for the first time for my Newfoundland fans,  I will be available for book signings!

I’m on-stage at 8:15 on Friday, June 7th as part of a panel discussion Breaking through the Noise: How to Increase the Canadian Presence for Books in a Digital World: Case studies in other media

But I will be at the conference as an attendee for the rest of the time, so ping me on Twitter if you’re going!

Opioids in the 1930s

Opium smokers in the East End of London, London Illustrated News, 1874

As part of my research for book 4, I’ve been reading up on morphine addiction in the early part of the 20th century. I found out, for example, that Sigmund Freud died of a morphine overdose that was administered by his own doctor in an assisted suicide (Freud had mouth cancer and decided he was done at the age of 83 in 1939).

Addiction to morphine was called the ‘soldiers disease’ as many fighting men came back from the first world war (and second) addicted to the pain killer.

Laudanum (a pill or tincture made from opium and sometimes the addition of saffron, castor, ambergris, musk and nutmeg) was widely used in the 16th century, and well into the 20th.

Although many drugs containing opium were required to be labelled at the beginning of the 20th century, they were also commonly available without a prescription.

My first exposure to an opium den was in Arthur Conan Doyle’s story “The Man with the Twisted Lip,” one of my less favourite Holmes tales. Watson goes to find Holmes in the opium den down a “vile alley” on Upper Swandam Lane. In London in the 1930s, opium dens could be found in and around Pennyfields and the Limehouse Causeway.

map-limehouse.png

From what I’ve read, the description of the seediness and danger around these drug dens were both racially charged and more negative than real. But, any drug den, whether it’s in the 1930s or today, will attract a certain kind of customer, so the danger was probably accurately described. For example:

In a talk at the Docklands Museum on 28th January 2007, Dr. John Seed from Roehampton University explored some of the realities of Chinese life in Limehouse from 1900 – 1940. He showed how public responses to several drug scandals, to interracial marriage, to housing shortages and unemployment, contributed to an enduring myth: the idea of a Chinatown in Limehouse that never really existed. Read more here.

An anti-opium movement sprang up in response, mostly as a method of controlling the populace from “deviant” behaviours, but doctors were still prescribing various opioids as a method of pain control.

Riding the London underground

I’m writing a scene today where Portia catches sight of a suspect standing on the platform of a London tube stop, and I always like to watch this video when writing about that specific setting (and I’m very lucky such source material exists).

It’s from the 1930s, and hosted by the Kinolibrary Film Collections:

You can subscribe to the Kinolibrary on Youtube here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfM-3hDSJkd2M_YGSn8oVkw

Pre-order Pickles vs the Zombies

Just so you know, publishers LOVE it when pre-sales of books go well. And happy publishers usually leads to happy authors, so if you were thinking Pickles might make an awesome gift OR you just wanted to be the first to get your hot little paws on a copy, this is your chance!

Buy Pickles vs the Zombies at

My Double Life event


https://www.facebook.com/events/421700485052173/

Gotta love this event title and the panellists I am thrilled to be included with! Come by Ryerson on Tuesday and hear how we balance our “Double Lives.”

UPDATE: They posted the talk, so if you missed it, catch up here:
https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/64/Watch/15394.aspx

What if we name the spy Lancaster?

For those of you following along with the development of book 4 in the Portia Adams series, I think I’ve got a new tentative title: The Detective and the Spy.

It turns out the spy that Portia runs into in act 1 of the story, is becoming quite significant to the storyline. He started out as a Christopher, but in reading more about spies in the 1930s, I’m becoming enamoured of naming him after Ian Fleming, author of the James Bond series. Ian’s middle name is Lancaster, so here’s my question for all you fab fans out there, what do you prefer as a spy name?