What if Dr. Watson’s other grandchild was a psychologist?

'Take the red pill...'
‘Take the red pill…’

Oh boy. I just had a really cool idea: with Portia Adams the consulting detective now operating from 221B Baker St, how cool would it be if her cousin, another grandchild of Dr. John Watson, was a criminal psychologist?

I like that idea. I’m trying to work out if this new addition to Portia’s life should be a man or a woman. Regardless, there are all kinds of opportunities here for conflict, tension, competition, emotion… the list goes on and on.

This is a story after all, and I personally LOVE it when a character links to another character from canon, it’s like an inside joke between the author and I.

I have to think about it some more, but I had to write it down cause I haven’t stopped smiling since I thought of it.

NB: Just a quick edit, I wanted to make sure it was feasible that a woman at this time could be a practicing psychologist, and yes, it seems the first woman to earn a Phd in Psychology was Margaret Washburn, and that was way back in 1894, a good 30 years earlier. Margaret Lowenfield could serve as a good model for such a character.

CaseBook Titles

bunch of books on their sides
a series in order!

Ok, don’t laugh, but as I write casebook 7 of the Portia Adams Adventures, I am forgetting the order. How is that possible you ask? Sigh, editing, re-editing, transcribing, re-reading, and re-ordering… its bound to make a girl confused.
So here is an ordered list of the completed casebooks in the series:

1. Jewel of the Thames
2. A case of darkness
3. Unfound
4. Thrice Burned
5. Box 850
6. Truth be told (title picked by the faithful readers of this blog!)
7. Principessa (tentative)
8. Settling the Score (title picked by the faithful readers of this blog!)

Historical accuracy

Philippa Gregory
Philippa Gregory

Historical fiction seems to be about a careful weaving of facts that can be verified and the stories you tell around them. This is most evident in Philippa Gregory‘s books about the royals in Britain, a series of books I think I own entirely in hardcover (demonstrating my respect for them).

In an interview posted on AbeBooks, she says ” In historical fiction, you have to imagine conversations that may have happened, based on the historical facts.”

I wonder if that also extends to deaths of historical figures where the cause of death goes undocumented (as far as I can tell through my research)?