Toronto Newspapers of the 1930s

The Daily Star on sale.
The Daily Star on sale (from the BlogTO article – 2011, originally from the Toronto Archives)

I’m researching Toronto newspapers today and thought I would share some of my findings with you interested folks!

BlogTO has done a lot of my work for me in this piece from 2011.

It looks like The Globe and Mail was still called The Globe as of the early 1930s (this is prior to their merger with Mail and Empire in 1936). It would have been a viable source of news for Portia and Annie as they navigate the streets of Montreal and Toronto. Here is the wikipedia article for The Globe and Mail.

The Toronto Evening Telegram was a local Toronto paper which would have been hard to get one’s hands on outside of the city and folded in 1971. It was in direct competition with the Toronto Star, which back in the 30s was called The Toronto Daily Star, and was supposed to better represent the ‘common man’s interests. You can read more about the history of the Toronto Star on their website here.

The Montreal Gazette (just called Gazette in the 30s) it turns out has been around forever – founded in 1778 if you can imagine – and was in a dual French-English format. The competing Quebec Gazette is an English-language weekly these days but back in the 30s was a dual French-English weekly.

So there you have it. All the news our girls could want in print form!

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More research on the Baronet

Coat of arms for the Acland Baronet
Coat of arms for the Acland Baronet

As taken from the Wikipedia article here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_John_Dyke_Acland,_8th_Baronet

Motto Inébranlable (Unshakable)

Sir John Acland, 1st Baronet (d. 1647)
Sir Francis Acland, 2nd Baronet (d. 1649)
Sir John Acland, 3rd Baronet (d. 1655)
Sir Arthur Acland, 4th Baronet (d. 1672)
Sir Hugh Acland, 5th Baronet (d. 1714)
Sir Hugh Acland, 6th Baronet (1696–1728)
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 7th Baronet (1722–1785) (who was featured in the painting)
Sir John Dyke Acland, 8th Baronet (1778–1785)
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 9th Baronet (1752–1794)
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 10th Baronet (1787–1871)
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, 11th Baronet (1809–1898)
Sir (Charles) Thomas Dyke Acland, 12th Baronet (1842–1912)
Sir Arthur Herbert Dyke Acland, 13th Baronet (1847–1926)
Sir Francis Dyke Acland, 14th Baronet (1874–1939)
Sir Richard Dyke Acland, 15th Baronet (1906–1990)

Sir John Dyke Acland, 16th Baronet (1939–2009)
Sir Dominic Dyke Acland, 17th Baronet (b. 1962)

The heir apparent is the present holder’s oldest son Patrick Acland (b. 1993)
The ancestral family seat is Killerton Hall, near Broadclyst, Devon, which is now owned by the National Trust.

Nerissa

Meet Nerissa
Meet Nerissa

From Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, Nerissa is Portia’s lady-in-waiting and confidante. She marries Gratiano and escorts Portia on Portia’s trip to Venice by disguising herself as her law clerk.

She is also Portia Adam’s new Bloodhound puppy.

Too many mysteries to tie together?

Sigh, Book 4, and I have to tie together clearing Annie’s good name, solving the whole arson thing and dealing with a brand spankin’ new Arch Nemesis. I may have bitten off more than I can chew.

Why did I do this again? Oh yes, character development. Everyone who read books 1-3 tells me they want to know more about Portia, and that is why this book is so bloody complicated.

Ok, so the whole Pigeon thing.. how about if two chefs at the Palace were feuding and one accused the other of using pigeons in the chicken pot pie instead of, well, chicken? Ok, Annie reports this, the accused Chef is summarily dismissed, Annie’s story is retracted because the feud is discovered, and now this disgraced Chef is struggling in the market. Oh, but the crown prince misses his chicken pot pie (which was chicken after all that) so the kitchen staff try and fail to make it to the original Chef’s standard. They are forced to head down to the market and purchase a contract with the original Chef to create his masterpiece once a week for the Prince.

What if the bitter cuisinier decided to really stick it to his former employer and ACTUALLY serve pigeon in his much sought after pot pies? That would work, but wouldn’t he be arrested or at least run out of town for doing that to the Royals? Yeah, that’s where this goes off the rails. Who hires a vindictive Chef who’s been outed for switching pigeons for chickens? Um yes. Problem. Unless the next person who hires him values his culinary skills and has no love for the British Royals…. hmmm..