6000 words transcribed, way more to go

Turns out that 20 pages of handwritten story in my Moleskine = 6,000 words when typed into a word doc, which gives me a word count I can claim in the future. So when I tell you that I’ve written a page of Casebook 10 (not started, don’t get too excited) you will know that means about 300 words.

I feel like I’ve just created my own google currency convertor except it’s my Angela-font-handwriting-convertor. THE POWER!!! The universe is mine to command – to control!!

Ahem.

And now back to transcribing.

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Done writing CaseBook 8!

Mark Twain quote
Oh Mark Twain, you nailed it, Sir!

I don’t even have a working title for case book 8 (my next blog post will be a poll where I get your help again for naming it, like we did for Truth be Told ) but it’s done! Time to transcribe this puppy!

Finally onto transcribing!

Cat jumping for joy
This is me transcribing!

I can honestly say that for the first time in this series, I am looking forward to the transcription and resulting edits in the process.

Why you ask?

Because writing Principessa has been really hard! I’m not whining, I swear, but I really struggled with this case book, and I think I know why:

  • I came up with a premise for the location and client without a clear idea about the crime.
  • The politics in Italy in the 1930s make the crime I finally DID choose really complicated to engineer.
  • The language barrier for Portia is another complication that I kept stepping around unsuccessfully.

That is why I was determined to give myself a deadline for finishing this story (as so many of you bloggers out there recommend) while I was on vacation. My thinking is that even if this doesn’t end up being a story I want to keep, at least if it is fully out of my head and on the computer, I can move on to the NEXT story.

Mission accomplished in terms of finishing up the hand-written story, now onto transcribing where hopefully I will be able to tie off some of the raggedy edges.

Do you guys have the same experience with needing to finish the first story before you start the next?

Or do you allow yourselves the sweet sneaky nip into that next fun storyline?

Those tricksy ones and zeroes!

feline_facepalm_by_rogue_ranger
Yup, even the cat knows you screwed up
taken from http://stopandlaugh.blogspot.ca/2011/12/facepalm-cat.html

I KNEW there was a reason I wrote in long-hand and then transcribed – it’s for days exactly like yesterday!
It all started out well-planned, I was in the midst of transcribing Book 6 from the notebook to my laptop on Sunday, and, as sometimes happens, I expanded on a scene that I hadn’t really put enough detail into the first time I wrote it.

Fine.

Dandy even!

That’s why they call it a first draft!

You’re sensing the calamity that is about to reveal itself — aren’t you friends?

So now we have a new scene that exists no where else in this dimension OTHER than my computer…

On Monday, my son requests a park venture (since its Easter Monday and the guy has the day off, so heck, why not) and I think “Sure, I can transcribe at the park, no problem, kid!” I pack him up, transfer my book onto a USB key and pack up the Macbook Air which is so much easier to haul around.

We get to the park where it is as windy as that scene in Twister with the cow flying through the air (I kid you not) and still I’m cool, I’m composed, I can do this.

Pull out the USB key, attach it to the MacBook Air, scroll to the end to start typing and … hey! Waitaminute! What happened to that scene I wrote!? It’s not there. Scroll up…Scroll down… search for a few keywords I knew to have written. Nothin’ ! Bubkas.

Ok, hyperventilating a bit here now, but I can’t drag the kid home… he just got here, and a little wind ain’t gonna stop this kid from swinging his little heart out or digging all the way to Australia in the sandbox.

Fine, I think to myself, typing a marker that says [insert extra scene when you get home] and then continuing my transcription from my always-reliable-never-let-me-down notebook.

You see where this ends right?

That’s right. I get home, and somehow (though it was in my head the WHOLE TIME I SWEAR) save the new copy from the USB onto the old copy on my computer and now… there is no old copy. The scene is gone. GONE I TELL YOU.

Sorry, I’m not usually this dramatic with a keyboard, but I know all of you understand.

Those of you who don’t are probably saying to yourself:  “What’s the big deal? You wrote the scene once, just write it again!”

….

Let me explain: no matter how close my writing is the second time, it will NOT be the same as the first time and EVEN WORSE: I will always suspect that the first lost scene was exceedingly better than the replacement scene.

Always.

Forever.

I need a hug.